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Dirty Pretty Things by Michael Faudet

Dirty Pretty Things by Michael Faudet

Published 11 Aug 2016 By Andrews McMeel Publishing

Goodreads

Summary: Dirty Pretty Things is the much anticipated book by Michael Faudet.

His whimsical and often erotic writing has already captured the hearts and minds of literally thousands of readers from around the world. He paints vivid pictures with intricate words and explores the compelling themes of love, loss, relationships and sex.

All beautifully captured in poetry, prose, quotes and little short stories.

In the same vein as Lang Leav, Michael Faudet writes good steamy poetry. As the title of the poetry suggests, all of the poems within this book are quite rated. They’re mostly (if not all) about sex, love and relationships.

Just like Lang’s poetry, none of the poetry in Dirty Pretty Things are difficult to comprehend. They’re short, simple and pretty straight forward enough. His poems are quite visual, in the sense that you could imagine it right away. For those who are afraid to start reading poetry, both Michael Faudet and Lang Leav writes very simple poetry.

Most of the pieces revolve around sex, both yearning and wanting and the act itself. I did find that the pieces tend to sound repetitive due to the sexual nature of all of them (there’s only so many ways you could describe sex) but it was overall pretty good. His writing is not as floaty or pretty as Lang’s but both authors are completely different and the topics they write about differ greatly as well.

It is so hard not to compare the two works and authors, but it seems so difficult because Lang and Michael are actually a couple. In some ways you could see that their work compliments each other — one talks about more feelings while the other writes more about the physical aspects of a relationship. I feel like you’d have to read both Lang and Michael’s poetry books to get the whole picture (though both are good individually too) because both reflects greatly about what a relationship is like.

There were a few good pieces that I enjoyed from Dirty Pretty Things and I’m looking forward to pick up his next book of poetry.

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No More Dirty Looks By Siobhan O’Connor and Alexandra Spunt

No More Dirty Looks: The Truth About Your Beauty Products and the Ultimate Guide to Safe and Clean Cosmetics by Siobhan O’Connor and Alexandra Spunt
Published 13 Jul 2010 By Da Capo Lifelong Books

Goodreads

Summary: Your lipstick. Your nail polish. Your conditioner. Most of us don’t realize that the products we use every day can expose us to thousands of chemicals that are readily absorbed through our skin. The impact on your health? It’s not pretty. In this must-read, Siobhan O’Connor and Alexandra Spunt leave no bottle unturned. They found out all kinds of things the cosmetics industry doesn’t want you to know and now they’re going to share it with you.

– The most dangerous ingredients in widely-used brands and how they’re still not regulated
– Insider secrets from top scientists, dermatologists, and experts
– The 100 best clean makeup, hair care, and skin care products
– Cheap and simple do-it-yourself beauty recipes

It’s easy to make the switch to clean cosmetics. From mascara to moisturizers, shampoos to sunscreens, No More Dirty Looks will help you detox your regimen. Now you can be beautiful inside and out – because coming clean is the best look yet.

 

Today’s book review is a little bit different from usual. I’ve been reading a lot of beauty and fashion related books lately and this gem of a book was discovered from one of Anushka Rees’ blog post. I had a hard time finding this book and according to the librarian they no longer stock this on the shelves because its a very old edition. This book was first published in 2010 and there doesn’t seem to be newer editions of this, so I don’t know how accurate the information in this book is and if anything has changed within these 7 years.

No More Dirty Looks discusses about all the harmful chemicals and ingredients that can be found in our every day products like shampoo, body wash and even skin care. The authors discuss at great length about the FDA and what the FDA does and how major companies get their licensing and its horrifyingly shocking how easy it is for anyone to use a large amount of harmful chemicals in our products. It’s even more shocking to know that there are dangerous chemicals even in baby products — and that really speaks volume about how thorough these products are checked through.

The authors list down a series of dangerous chemicals and ingredients and provides alternatives that’s readily available in the market right now for a cheaper price (or slightly more expensive, but a product that is completely free of harmful chemicals) and what names (and alternate names) to look out for. I’ve personally looked through a bunch of my own products and noted that there are a lot of chemicals that were listed in the book, so perhaps not much have changed in the past 7 years.

Its important to note that the book states that out of the thousands of chemicals that were banned in Europe, only a handful have been banned in the US. I don’t know how accurate this information is but it is absolutely terrifying to just think about it.

I think its important for us to try to look into the ingredients that go into our everyday products, especially if we’re using it on large surface areas of our body and on a regular basis. I’m definitely interested to learn more and if there’s other books that has been released lately with more updated information. I urge you to do the same and look into these ingredients — it may be difficult to do a complete overhaul, but at least we could have the chance of making better and smarter choices.

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Sad Girls By Lang Leav

Sad Girls by Lang Leav
Published 30 May 2017 By Andrews McMeel Publishing

Goodreads

Summary: “Your first love isn’t the first person you give your heart to—it’s the first one who breaks it.”

Sad Girls is the much anticipated debut novel from international best-selling author Lang Leav. A beautifully written and emotionally charged coming of age story, where young love, dark secrets, and tragedy collide.

School is almost out for Audrey, but the panic attacks are just beginning. Because Audrey told a lie and now her classmate, Ana, is dead. Just as her world begins to spin out of control, Audrey meets the enigmatic Rad—the boy who could turn it all around. But will their ill-timed romance drive her closer to the edge?

 

Since the day that Lang Leav revealed that she was working on her debut novel, I was already clutching on to my pearls. I knew it was going to be frickin’ good.

I WAS NOT WRONG.

Before you go on thinking that this is a completely biased review, hold on to your horses because it isn’t. I don’t read what I don’t like but Sad Girls, yes, Sad Girls I loved.

There is something so poetic about the way Lang writes. Of course, if you didn’t know her already she’s a poet. I’m sure by now you’ve seen her artwork or poetry floating around twitter, tumblr and instagram but I have loved her work since she released Love & Misadventure. In fact, I’ve already met her thrice. (Read my review on her second poetry book, Lullabies!)

Sad Girls begins with our main protagonist, Audrey, admitting that she did something wrong. She told a lie and now Ana, one of her classmates is dead. The book follows through her struggle to cope with the lie she’s told, her newly found anxiety and then, she meets a boy.

Cliche, am I right? Just wait for it.

Audrey and Rad found each other in a moment of grief. They had an unspoken bound between them that they needed to stay with each other out of necessity. They are two very broken, very lost individuals who needed someone who help carry them forward. This relationship that happened between the two were the natural reactions of two sad souls, desperate for something to hold on to — and in this case, each other. Their romance was a natural progression: in fact, they cut ties from each other, both trying to find their own way through life alone and then later rekindled their love many months later.

Sad Girls talks about mental illness, drug abuse, death and a little bit of LGBTQ+. There are so many diverse characters in this book, each playing a very significant role in Audrey’s life. Almost all the characters in this book is flawed — especially Audrey and that’s what makes Sad Girls a little bit more realistic than the rest. Everyone, even the adults, are just people who are trying their best to get by. It’s not complicated; it’s just reality.

Of course there are times when I felt that Audrey had it too easy (like her job and internship) but it is what helped to drive the story along. I sat on this review for a while because I needed to process the whole book. I loved it, and its easily on of my favourite books of 2017 but there is one glaring problem with Audrey: I still don’t know why she told the lie.

I’d love to see Sad Girls made into a film (I could already picture the scenes in my head while reading this) or even a companion book told in Ana’s point of view. I feel like the epilogue left me longing for more. There’s so much about Ana that we don’t know (only told from the perspective of the other characters) and I feel like she could be an interesting character for us to learn more about.

Sad Girls will be on my mind for a long time to come. Pick it up, read it, and then reread it again.

A lot of literature is about struggle. But I don’t think all writers are sad. I think it’s the other way around — all sad people write. It’s a form of catharsis, a way of working through things that feel unresolved, like undoing a knot. People who are prone to sadness are more likely to pick up a pen.

Sad Girls by Lang Leav