Sad Girls By Lang Leav

Sad Girls by Lang Leav
Published 30 May 2017 By Andrews McMeel Publishing

Goodreads

Summary: “Your first love isn’t the first person you give your heart to—it’s the first one who breaks it.”

Sad Girls is the much anticipated debut novel from international best-selling author Lang Leav. A beautifully written and emotionally charged coming of age story, where young love, dark secrets, and tragedy collide.

School is almost out for Audrey, but the panic attacks are just beginning. Because Audrey told a lie and now her classmate, Ana, is dead. Just as her world begins to spin out of control, Audrey meets the enigmatic Rad—the boy who could turn it all around. But will their ill-timed romance drive her closer to the edge?

 

Since the day that Lang Leav revealed that she was working on her debut novel, I was already clutching on to my pearls. I knew it was going to be frickin’ good.

I WAS NOT WRONG.

Before you go on thinking that this is a completely biased review, hold on to your horses because it isn’t. I don’t read what I don’t like but Sad Girls, yes, Sad Girls I loved.

There is something so poetic about the way Lang writes. Of course, if you didn’t know her already she’s a poet. I’m sure by now you’ve seen her artwork or poetry floating around twitter, tumblr and instagram but I have loved her work since she released Love & Misadventure. In fact, I’ve already met her thrice. (Read my review on her second poetry book, Lullabies!)

Sad Girls begins with our main protagonist, Audrey, admitting that she did something wrong. She told a lie and now Ana, one of her classmates is dead. The book follows through her struggle to cope with the lie she’s told, her newly found anxiety and then, she meets a boy.

Cliche, am I right? Just wait for it.

Audrey and Rad found each other in a moment of grief. They had an unspoken bound between them that they needed to stay with each other out of necessity. They are two very broken, very lost individuals who needed someone who help carry them forward. This relationship that happened between the two were the natural reactions of two sad souls, desperate for something to hold on to — and in this case, each other. Their romance was a natural progression: in fact, they cut ties from each other, both trying to find their own way through life alone and then later rekindled their love many months later.

Sad Girls talks about mental illness, drug abuse, death and a little bit of LGBTQ+. There are so many diverse characters in this book, each playing a very significant role in Audrey’s life. Almost all the characters in this book is flawed — especially Audrey and that’s what makes Sad Girls a little bit more realistic than the rest. Everyone, even the adults, are just people who are trying their best to get by. It’s not complicated; it’s just reality.

Of course there are times when I felt that Audrey had it too easy (like her job and internship) but it is what helped to drive the story along. I sat on this review for a while because I needed to process the whole book. I loved it, and its easily on of my favourite books of 2017 but there is one glaring problem with Audrey: I still don’t know why she told the lie.

I’d love to see Sad Girls made into a film (I could already picture the scenes in my head while reading this) or even a companion book told in Ana’s point of view. I feel like the epilogue left me longing for more. There’s so much about Ana that we don’t know (only told from the perspective of the other characters) and I feel like she could be an interesting character for us to learn more about.

Sad Girls will be on my mind for a long time to come. Pick it up, read it, and then reread it again.

A lot of literature is about struggle. But I don’t think all writers are sad. I think it’s the other way around — all sad people write. It’s a form of catharsis, a way of working through things that feel unresolved, like undoing a knot. People who are prone to sadness are more likely to pick up a pen.

Sad Girls by Lang Leav

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s