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Mini Reviews: Confessions of a Shopaholic (#5 & #6)

Shopaholic & Baby by Sophie Kinsella
Confessions of a Shopaholic #5
Published 27 Feb 2007 by Dial Press

Goodreads

Summary: Becky Brandon (nee Bloomwood) is pregnant! She couldn’t be more overjoyed-especially since discovering that shopping cures morning sickness. Everything has got to be perfect for her baby: from the designer nursery . . . to the latest, coolest pram . . . to the celebrity, must-have obstetrician.

But when the celebrity obstetrician turns out to be her husband Luke’s glamorous, intellectual ex-girlfriend, Becky’s perfect world starts to crumble. She’s shopping for two . . . but are there three in her marriage?

Mini Shopaholic by Sophie Kinsella
Confessions of a Shopaholic #6
Published 21 Sept 2010 by Dial Press

Goodreads

Summary: Sophie Kinsella has dazzled readers with her irresistible Shopaholic novels–sensational international bestsellers that have garnered millions of devoted fans and catapulted her into the first rank of contemporary storytellers. Now her beloved heroine Becky Brandon (nee Bloomwood) returns in a hilarious tale of married life, toddlerhood, and the perils of trying to give a fabulous surprise party–on a budget!

Becky Brandon thought motherhood would be a breeze and that having a daughter was a dream come true: a shopping friend for life! But it’s trickier than she thought. Two-year-old Minnie has a quite different approach to shopping.

Minnie creates havoc everywhere she goes, from Harrods to her own christening. Her favorite word is “Mine!” and she’s even trying to get into eBay! On top of everything else, Becky and Luke are still living with her parents (the deal on house #4 has fallen through), when suddenly there’s a huge financial crisis.

With people having to “cut back,” Becky decides to throw a surprise party for Luke to cheer everyone up. But when costs start to spiral out of control, she must decide whether to accept help from an unexpected source–and therefore run the risk of hurting the person she loves.

Will Becky be able to pull off the celebration of the year? Will she and Luke ever find a home of their own? Will Minnie ever learn to behave? And . . . most important . . . will Becky’s secret wishes ever come true?

 

As the summaries suggests, Becky is now a mother of one tenacious little Minnie Brandon. I really really really loved the addition of Minnie. She’s such a hilarious little girl. Her favourite word is “mine”, and while its completely adorable, she gets a little bit bossy and demanding, kind of like Becky.

Becky does quite a bit of growing up in these two books. She learns how to deal with being a mother, learning how to deal with being told that she’s a shopaholic (yes, someone finally told her!) and dealing how to work with a budget. I feel that her character has definitely grown and developed, especially in book 6. She learns how to handle relationships more carefully and tries even harder to keep things together. She seems more responsible, even.

Again, I have to stress that this book or series isn’t going to be for everyone. Becky and her shopaholic problems may rub people off the wrong way, but this is just one of those books people either love or hate. Either way, this series is fairly simple to get into and its not very deep — they’re very straightforward and easy to digest.

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Mini Reviews: Confessions of a Shopaholic (#2 – #4) By Sophie Kinsella

Shopaholic Takes Manhattan By Sophie Kinsella
Confessions of a Shopaholic #2
Published 29 Jan 2002 By Dial Press Trade Paperback

Goodreads

Summary: With her shopping excesses (somewhat) in check and her career as a TV financial guru thriving, Becky Bloomwood’s biggest problem seems to be tearing her entrepreneur boyfriend, Luke, away from work for a romantic country weekend. That is, until Luke announces he’s moving to New York for business—and he asks Becky to go with him! Before you can say “Prada sample sale,” Becky has landed in the Big Apple, home of Park Avenue penthouses and luxury department stores.

Surely it’s only a matter of time until Becky becomes an American celebrity. She and Luke will be the toast of Gotham society. Nothing can stand in their way, especially with Becky’s bills an ocean away in London. But then an unexpected disaster threatens her career prospects, her relationship with Luke, and her available credit line. Becky may have taken Manhattan—but will she have to return it?


Shopaholic Ties the Knot By Sophie Kinsella
Confessions of a Shopaholic #3
Published 31 Aug 2004 By Dell Publishing Company

Goodreads

Summary: Life has been good for Becky Bloomwood: She’s become the best personal shopper at Barneys, she and her successful entrepreneurial boyfriend, Luke, are living happily in Manhattan’s West Village, and her new next-door neighbor is a fashion designer! But with her best friend, Suze, engaged, how can Becky fail to notice that her own ring finger is bare? Not that she’s been thinking of marriage (or diamonds) or anything . . . Then Luke proposes! Bridal registries dance in Becky’s head. Problem is, two other people are planning her wedding: Becky’s overjoyed mother has been waiting forever to host a backyard wedding, with the bride resplendent in Mum’s frilly old gown. While Luke’s high-society mother is insisting on a glamorous, all-expenses-paid affair at the Plaza. Both weddings for the same day. And Becky can’t seem to turn down either one. Can everyone’s favorite shopaholic tie the knot before everything unravels?

Shopaholic on Honeymoon By Sophie Kinsella
Confessions of a Shopaholic #3.5
Published 10 Dec 2014 by Transworld Digital

Goodreads

Summary: The new Mr and Mrs Brandon are on honeymoon, and Becky has big plans! They’ve got a whole year to explore Venice, learn yoga in India, sleep in little wooden huts in South America… maybe even see penguins in the Arctic. And of course they’ll need to buy just a few essential souvenirs along the way (everyone needs a set of Murano glass goblets, after all).

 

They’re not just tourists, they’re travellers. Becky is sure it is just the thing that Luke needs – time to unwind. He’ll come back a changed man… with all the good bits still intact of course.

But it soon becomes clear that Luke has different plans entirely. Can Becky help him let go, or will this little disagreement threaten their whole honeymoon?

Shopaholic and Sister By Sophie Kinsella
Confessions of a Shopaholic #4
Published 30 Aug 2005 By Dial Press Trade Paperback

Goodreads

Summary: Trouble between newly weds Luke and Becky Brandon started on their honeymoon, when Becky told a tiny fib about a shopping purchase. Luke put her on a budget and she’s struggling.

 

But things look up when, on her return, she finds out she’s got a long-lost sister. But Becky’s sister isn’t what she expects – her sister can’t, surely, hate shopping … ?

This series seems to get A LOT of flack from people. I don’t know why! OK, so maybe Becky Bloomwood is kind of silly and she doesn’t learn her lesson even after 4 books (let alone all 8…) but aside from her very obvious shopping problem, Becky is such a hilarious character. She’s so colourful, so silly yet so smart in her own right. We keep forgetting that she’s a former financial journalist and had a very popular television gig going for her before it all went to dust. She’s such a determined and strong character, a little ditzy, but she makes up for much of it with her other pleasant qualities. It’s so hard to hate Becky, personally. She’s such a charming character, its rather hard to put her off.

People say this book should have ended ages ago — she should have learnt her lesson by now. But, so what if she hasn’t? I think that’s the way people are. I personally have a bit of a spending problem myself, and sometimes its hard to accept that we have such problems and its even harder to kick the habit. I find that her character is quite realistic in that sense — it makes her quite human, although that can make her unlikeable to many. To each their own, I suppose.

The books are very fun in general. As the title suggests, Becky gets into all kinds of trouble, from moving to New York, to getting married, and finally meeting her long-lost sister. It’s a very quick and fun easy read, mindless almost. The books aren’t deep, they’re not supposed to be. They’re just very very fun and addictive. I read them one after another — and if you love the idea of following a shopaholic on a life journey through clothes and hidden bank statements, then pick these books up.

In fact, I’ve only just found out that Sophie Kinsella has written a #3.5 of what happens during Becky and Luke’s honeymoon. Its available to read for free on her website. Enjoy reading, folks!

 

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Viral By Helen Fitzpatrick

Viral By Helen Fitzpatrick
Published: 11 Aug 2016 by Faber Faber

Goodreads

Summary: So far, twenty-three thousand and ninety-six people have seen me online.

Su has always been the successful sister. It’s Leah who is wild and often angry. But when they go to Magaluf to celebrate their exam results, Su disappears.

Su is on the run, humiliated and afraid. There’s an online video of her performing multiple sex acts in a nightclub. And everyone has seen it.

Their mother Ruth, a prominent court judge, is furious. Can she bring justice to the men who took advantage of her daughter, and what will it take to bring Su home?

‘Read it.’ Stylist

‘Gripping.’ Tammy Cohen, author of When She Was Bad

‘A real psychological roller-coaster.’ Scotsman

 

TW: Sexual abuse, drug and alcohol abuse, attempted rape

OK. From the trigger warning alone, you probably might have guessed what this book is about. I couldn’t stop thinking about this book for days. Days. I kept thinking and thinking and thinking and I just — I can’t find the words to explain how I really feel about it.

I’ve never read a Helen Fitzpatrick before. I came across this book randomly at a library and the first line got to me. I can’t share it here because it’s of very sexual nature but it gripped me. I’ve never read a book that’s so straightforward before. And just like its opening line, the book is pretty straightforward — it doesn’t hide away any of the gory bits, doesn’t shun away from the reality of what society could be like, the dangers of alcohol and drug abuse, the real problem about recording and uploading videos — the idea of consent. This book really dives into the problems that our current society and youths of today are facing. Its raw, its real, its scary. It makes you keep reading in fear. You keep reading because its one of those books you just NEED to know the ending to.

This doesn’t mean the book doesn’t have flaws. I had a problem with the main character Su and I had a problem with her mother. Su isn’t a perfect main character. I don’t think Fitzpatrick intended for her to be. She’s a broken character, disguised behind a forced perfection. She doesn’t belong, she’s desperate. But — I couldn’t understand what came after. I couldn’t understand her sudden desperation to lose her virginity, I couldn’t understand her frame of mind that would make her consider that a top priority when she’s supposedly trying to run away from the problem: the sexual video. Maybe it’s just one of those things I don’t understand, but that’s okay. Su’s mother on the other hand, though I get that she’s reacting out of anger, there’s a lot about the chapters from her point of view that left me wondering. I didn’t quite understand if portions of it were flashbacks, or if she really went out of her way to dress up as someone else to seduce a man. Her chapters were kind of messy, it was hard to keep track of what she was doing. Is this Fitzpatrick’s intention? She’s a woman who is ruffled to the core, equally desperate, if not more, and trying to save her daughter. Is this why she’s messy? Or has this suddenly gone way too deep?

Well.

Truth is, Viral has been on my mind for weeks after I finished it. I couldn’t properly write a review because I just didn’t know how I felt. I wanted more, the ending, I wanted a proper revenge. I just felt that after all the trouble they went through, the closure they decided on was too little, too small. It didn’t end with a big impact as much as I had hoped and it was a little bit of a let down. Nevertheless, I really enjoyed Viral. I flew through it really quickly and its one of those books that’s really hard to put down. If you’re looking for a kind of quick thriller, try picking up Viral.

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Girls on Fire By Robin Wasserman

Girls on Fire By Robin Wasserman
Published 16 May 2016 By Harper

Goodreads

Summary: Girls on Fire tells the story of Hannah and Lacey and their obsessive teenage female friendship so passionately violent it bloodies the very sunset its protagonists insist on riding into, together, at any cost. Opening with a suicide whose aftermath brings good girl Hannah together with the town’s bad girl, Lacey, the two bring their combined wills to bear on the community in which they live; unconcerned by the mounting discomfort that their lust for chaos and rebellion causes the inhabitants of their parochial small town, they think they are invulnerable.

But Lacey has a secret, about life before her better half, and it’s a secret that will change everything…

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Trigger Warning: mental, physical and sexual abuse + religious / cult elements

This book scared me.

The Virgin Suicides is one of my favourite books, and when I saw it on the blurb, I knew I had to read it. After reading the book description on Buzzfeed, I was intrigued.

The book opens with a suicide of a boy in Hannah Dexter’s class. He was a popular, well beloved golden boy who decided to shoot himself in the woods. Nobody understood why, but people were convinced: he joined a cult, brainwashed, messed with things bigger than all of us. The 90s setting of this book was amazing; Robin Wasserman did a great job setting everything up. Having been born in the 90s, it was interesting to read about how witchcraft, cults and Kurt Cobain became a great part of many people’s lives or how it affected them and their town.

In comes new girl Lacey, who decided to befriend Hannah, or now lovingly known as Dex, after being publicly humiliated by Nikki Drummond, the most popular girl in school.

Does the plot sound familiar to you? Good girl gets bullied, befriends mysterious new girl and transforms into someone else? Yeah, I thought so. But believe me when I say that Robin Wasserman makes the story her own. Her writing will draw you in, suck you up and force you to turn the pages.

The reality is, Girls on Fire is hella scary and hella good. Wasserman makes you get inside their heads, make them tell you the story, everything that they’re thinking. The chapters alternate between Dex, telling her story and Lacey, telling Dex her story. There are several chapters of “US” that’s just stories from outsiders, namely, their parents and how they’re just trying their best, but it gives you a glimpse of why things are the way they are.

Lacey is psychotic. There is something about her character and the way she mentally gets to you is extremely terrifying but you need to keep reading to know what she’s done, what she’s going to do, her train of thoughts.

While Lacey orchestrates the show, Hannah’s character serves to move Lacey’s ideologies. She is the typical average follower, but its so scary how much of Lacey is within her and how eventually her own ideologies are planted by Lacey herself. And Nikki, oh. Nikki, she isn’t so simple either. I wish there were more of her, and towards the end I wanted to hear more about her story.

Girls on Fire stands on its own. The familiar plot or typical characters doesn’t matter here. Robin Wasserman took something familiar, and spun it to the beat of her own drum.

You need to read this. This book will haunt me for years to come.

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Wedding Night By Sophie Kinsella

Wedding Night By Sophie Kinsella
Published 13 May 2014 By Dial Press

Goodreads

Summary: Lottie just knows that her boyfriend is going to propose, but then his big question involves a trip abroad — not a trip down the aisle. Completely crushed, Lottie reconnects with an old flame, and they decide to take drastic action. No dates, no moving in together, they’ll just get married . . . right now. Her sister, Fliss, thinks Lottie is making a terrible mistake, and will do anything to stop her. But Lottie is determined to say “I do,” for better, or for worse.

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Sophie Kinsella does it again! I fell in love with Sophie Kinsella after reading her first Shoppaholic book and decided to give her standalone book I’ve Got Your Number a try. I’ve said it before but Kinsella just has her way of making her characters feel so alive. They’re funny, witty, a little bit crazy, but they feel like people I could be friends with forever in real life. And that’s exactly how I felt reading Wedding Night.

Wedding Night is told in two different perspectives, Lottie (our main character) and her sister Fliss, who is Lottie’s big sister. Lottie is convinced that her boyfriend of three years is going to marry her, but when he has other plans for her, she finds herself in the arms of her summer love fifteen years ago, Ben, who proposes to her — and of course Lottie says yes! In comes Lottie who is desperately trying to stop Lottie and Ben from getting married and so is Lorcan, Ben’s well…. maybe best friend.

You can never go wrong with a Sophie Kinsella novel. Its fun, funny and simple. Perfect for lazy days and beach reads. Of course, like every other chick lit, it may not be everybody’s cup of tea and the plots may overlap with each other, but hey, if you’re going to read a chick lit, it might as well be from the queen of chick lits herself. Read this, laugh, and cry. You can thank me later.

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Love, Rosie By Cecilia Ahern

Love, Rosie By Cecilia Ahern
Published 1 Dec 2006 By Hachette Books

Goodreads

Summary: Sometimes you have to look at life in a whole new way…

From the bestselling author of PS, I Love You comes a delightfully enchanting novel about what happens when two people who are meant to be together just can’t seem to get it right.

Rosie and Alex are destined for one another, and everyone seems to know it but them. Best friends since childhood, their relationship gets closer by the day, until Alex gets the news that his family is leaving Dublin and moving to Boston. At 17, Rosie and Alex have just started to see each other in a more romantic light. Devastated, the two make plans for Rosie to apply to colleges in the U.S.

She gets into Boston University, Alex gets into Harvard, and everything is falling into place, when on the eve of her departure, Rosie gets news that will change their lives forever: She’s pregnant by a boy she’d gone out with while on the rebound from Alex.

Her dreams for college, Alex, and a glamorous career dashed, Rosie stays in Dublin to become a single mother, while Alex pursues a medical career and a new love in Boston. But destiny is a funny thing, and in this novel, structured as a series of clever e-mails, letters, notes, and a trail of missed opportunities, Alex and Rosie find out that fate isn’t done with them yet.

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Love, Rosie is absolutely adorable. I’ve been waiting ages to get my copy in the library but there’s always a million other people waiting for it. So I gave up, went on a short getaway to a neighbouring country, and bought the damn book. I flew through Love, Rosie so quickly, that I needed and wanted more. I have yet to see the movie but I worry that what I envisioned for Love, Rosie would be ruined.

Love, Rosie is told in a series of emails between Rosie and her best friend Alex. It starts from where they are merely kids and continued on as adults. Love, Rosie is your typical contemporary romance, but the email chains gives it a new twist. Its interesting, fascinating almost, kind of like you’re peeking into someone’s personal inbox. And it’s not just between Rosie and Alex — you get to see interactions between Rosie and her sisters, Alex and his brother, and so on. The story is absolutely heartbreaking, the ending sort of bittersweet.

Love, Rosie is something I would definitely recommend for those of you looking for a contemporary adult romance book that isn’t too cheesy but definitely a quick read!

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The Good Girl By Mary Kubica

The Good Girl By Mary Kubica
Published 29 July 2014 By Harlequin MIRA

Goodreads

Summary: One night, Mia Dennett enters a bar to meet her on-again, off-again boyfriend, but when he doesn’t show up, she leaves with an enigmatic stranger.

At first Colin Thatcher seems like a safe one-night stand, but following Colin home will turn out to be the worst mistake of Mia’s life.

 

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Holy effin’ crap.

I read The Good Girl a while back and this book still haunts me. Part of me is slightly disappointed with the ending, but a large majority of me loves this book. I don’t tend to read hyped books, but I took a plunge because the premise sounded really awesome. And it is.

The Good Girl, for the most part doesn’t disappoint. It’s about a girl who goes missing and when she returns she isn’t herself and has lost parts of her memory. In fact, she goes by a whole other name and a completely new persona. The book is told in three different POVs: her mom, Mia/Chloe and Colin (her kidnapper). I really enjoyed the different POVs. It really gave you a full, detailed story from everyone’s perspective which really added to the story. Same events, different thoughts. I think the POV gave room for not only more information but also dug into their character individually. You could see how things changed for them and how their character developed overtime.

In terms of POVs, I think The Good Girl has executed it well. I particularly enjoyed Mia’s POV and her transition into becoming Chloe and Colin’s perspective, mainly because it’s different and interesting to look at things in the eyes of a kidnapper. Mia’s mom mainly delves around what she hasn’t done for Mia and has a story arc of her own with the detective and their search for Mia. It was interesting, but it wasn’t as interesting as following the “main” story itself. I felt that because her mom’s POV is somewhat delayed and also revolves around post-kidnapping, it wasn’t as impactful as what happened during.

My issue with The Good Girl is perhaps the ending. It felt a little flat to me, and after all that happened and the action and drama, the ending almost fizzled out. It was unexpected (for me at least) but I kind of wish something else would have happened. But I think because of the ending, it propelled Mia to become more and more isolated. I think psychologically, Mia feels attached to Colin and the ending just broke her.

One other issue is that I felt that sometimes Mia’s mom’s “sense” that so and so happened to her daughter in a dream or something was really over the chart. I understand that it’s a real thing and does happen, but at the time I read it, it felt so forced like it was input into the story just so the detective can actually DO SOMETHING.

Overall, The Good Girl was worth the hype. It was engaging, interesting and I flew threw the book. Even after I was done I kept thinking about it and I wanted to read it again. Definitely a book to recommend everyone especially if you darker/crime/thriller books. I am shocked that this is a debut novel because it is FANTASTIC. Highly recommended!

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Confessions of a Shopaholic By Sophie Kinsella

Confessions of a Shopaholic By Sophie Kinsella
Shopaholic #1
Published 4 March 2003 By The Dial Press

Goodreads

Summary: Becky Bloomwood has a fabulous flat in London’s trendiest neighborhood, a troupe of glamorous socialite friends, and a closet brimming with the season’s must-haves. The only trouble is, she can’t actually afford it—not any of it. Her job writing at Successful Saving magazine not only bores her to tears, it doesn’t pay much at all. And lately Becky’s been chased by dismal letters from the bank—letters with large red sums she can’t bear to read. She tries cutting back. But none of her efforts succeeds. Her only consolation is to buy herself something . . . just a little something.

Finally a story arises that Becky actually cares about, and her front-page article catalyzes a chain of events that will transform her life—and the lives of those around her—forever.

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Fun, fun, fun!

I think Sophie Kinsella has a way of making you fall in love with her characters. I watched the movie when it was out and it was alright, but I never felt the desire to pick the book up. But as I read he first few pages of Confessions of a Shopaholic, I knew I was instantly going to love it. Rebecca is the perfect mix of ditzy-intelligent. She’s witty, intelligent and aware of her problems, but Rebecca has a problem: she’s a shopaholic and can’t pay the bills.

Rebecca is a realistic character with realistic problems, which is probably why her character is very well loved. Rebecca’s hilarious antics and attempts to dodge paying her bills is something I look forward to with each chapter. I absolutely loved that there are bank letters before the chapters — my favourite is the one in Finnish but all of them are equally hilarious!

Confessions of a Shopaholic is far superior from its movie counterpart. The movie omitted quite a lot from the book and changed some minor things such as Becky being American (she’s British in the books) and working for a gardening magazine (she works for Successful Savings in the books). The movie omitted Becky’s successful article for The Daily World, which I feel is one of the core plot of the book. I didn’t quite enjoy the movie version of Becky Bloomwood — she came off as too ditzy and silly, but the original book version of Becky Bloomwood was charming (albeit also ditzy and silly!)

I finally understand why people love this series so much. Its so easy to read but has fantastic and charming characters with a simple yet good plot. I do see myself continue picking the rest of the series up — I’m excited to see what Rebecca gets into next!

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I’ve Got Your Number By Sophie Kinsella

I’ve Got Your Number By Sophie Kinsella
Published 14 Feb 2012 By The Dial Press

Goodreads

SummaryI’ve lost it. 😦 The only thing in the world I wasn’t supposed to lose. My engagement ring. It’s been in Magnus’s family for three generations. And now the very same day his parents are coming, I’ve lost it. The very same day! Do not hyperventilate, Poppy. Stay positive 🙂 !!

Poppy Wyatt has never felt luckier. She is about to marry her ideal man, Magnus Tavish, but in one afternoon her “happily ever after” begins to fall apart. Not only has she lost her engagement ring in a hotel fire drill but in the panic that follows, her phone is stolen. As she paces shakily around the lobby, she spots an abandoned phone in a trash can. Finders keepers! Now she can leave a number for the hotel to contact her when they find her ring. Perfect!

Well, perfect except that the phone’s owner, businessman Sam Roxton, doesn’t agree. He wants his phone back and doesn’t appreciate Poppy reading his messages and wading into his personal life.

What ensues is a hilarious and unpredictable turn of events as Poppy and Sam increasingly upend each other’s lives through emails and text messages. As Poppy juggles wedding preparations, mysterious phone calls, and hiding her left hand from Magnus and his parents . . . she soon realizes that she is in for the biggest surprise of her life.

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I absolutely loved I’ve Got Your Number!

Over the years I’ve heard nothing but good things about Sophie Kinsella’s work. And now I can understand why. I don’t often read chick lit (or adult books for that matter) so I was a little bit worried if I would enjoy this but I really fell in love with Poppy.

I’ve Got Your Number has a good, simple yet engaging plot. But I think what made me love this book so much are the characters. They’re absolutely silly and hilarious, but at the same time they manage to weave themselves into your heart. I’ve grown so attached to Poppy and Sam; I wish there was a sequel or anything at all just so I can see what they get up to.

I’ve Got Your Number started off with Poppy losing her engagement ring and by the end of a luckless night, her phone gets knicked. By a stroke of luck, she finds this phone thrown into the bin and decides that she would use the number temporarily while she sorts out her ring problems. In comes Sam, telling her it’s company property and that she needs to return it. Poppy and Sam soon become fast acquaintances, while Sam’s company get embroiled in a fiasco.

I enjoyed the plot a lot more than I thought I would. The brilliant and hilarious writing, along with Poppy’s silly antics made the book even more charming and heartwarming. The plot was light, but there was a good range and flow of the different story arcs. While I enjoyed it all, my favourite has to be when Poppy becomes Sam’s maybe, sort of, but not quite PA and becomes his sidekick during the company fiasco. It really made me fall in love with Sam and Poppy as a duo, rather than individuals. The book also has other shining stars like Poppy’s hilarious friend Annalise.

I have so much love for I’ve Got Your Number. I can definitely see myself reading more Sophie Kinsella. I hope I’ll keep getting attached to the different characters. I hope this gets made into a movie at some point. I loved the Cofessions of a Shoppaholic movie and I love I’ll just love seeing Poppy and Sam on the big screen.

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Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? By Roz Chast

Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? By Roz Chast
Published 6 May 2014 By Bloomsbury USA

Goodreads

Summary#1 New York Times Bestseller

2014 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST

In her first memoir, Roz Chast brings her signature wit to the topic of aging parents. Spanning the last several years of their lives and told through four-color cartoons, family photos, and documents, and a narrative as rife with laughs as it is with tears, Chast’s memoir is both comfort and comic relief for anyone experiencing the life-altering loss of elderly parents.

When it came to her elderly mother and father, Roz held to the practices of denial, avoidance, and distraction. But when Elizabeth Chast climbed a ladder to locate an old souvenir from the “crazy closet”—with predictable results—the tools that had served Roz well through her parents’ seventies, eighties, and into their early nineties could no longer be deployed.

While the particulars are Chast-ian in their idiosyncrasies—an anxious father who had relied heavily on his wife for stability as he slipped into dementia and a former assistant principal mother whose overbearing personality had sidelined Roz for decades—the themes are universal: adult children accepting a parental role; aging and unstable parents leaving a family home for an institution; dealing with uncomfortable physical intimacies; managing logistics; and hiring strangers to provide the most personal care.

An amazing portrait of two lives at their end and an only child coping as best she can, Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant will show the full range of Roz Chast’s talent as cartoonist and storyteller.

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Heartbreaking, raw and hilarious all in one, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? is one of the best graphic memoirs I have read so far.

Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant is a story of the author and her parents. They’re a little bit quirky but absolutely adorable. I kept turning the pages and finished it in one sitting.

Can’t We Talk About takes for a more heart-wrenching turn when her parents fall ill and she struggled with medical bills, taking care of them and having to juggle her parents and her family. It was increasingly difficult for her to cope, as evidently, it was difficult for her parents to cope being apart from each other.

Can’t We Talk About made me weep. I kept thinking of my own parents and now that they’re ageing I wonder what the future will be like. It is impossible to not look at your own life and your parents’ lives when reading this book — it makes you think so much about what is going to happen (or has happened). I absolutely loved her parents. Their love for each other is eternal, and its evident even to the end. It is heartwarming to read about it and I feel like the memoir has given me an opportunity to witness true love.

I’ve been reading a lot of memoir graphic novels as of late, and this is one that will stay with me for a very long time. Its such a simple and accessible story, yet so powerful and packed with emotions. It is raw and beautiful, especially the sketches of her mother at the end. I absolutely loved this book and I highly recommend it.

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