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Crazy is My Superpower By AJ Mendez Brooks

Crazy is My Superpower By AJ Mendez Brooks
Published 4 April 2017 By Penguin Random House

Goodreads

Summary: Three-time WWE Diva’s Champion A.J. Brooks’ Crazy is My Superpower is a literary memoir chronicling her unlikely rise from 100-pound nerd growing up in extreme poverty and enduring years of abuse to international sex symbol and professional wrestling champion (known as A.J. Lee). A.J. fought against stereotypes, forced the men in her industry to view her with respect, and inspired a huge fan base of over 2 million Twitter followers with her fierce independent streak.

I cried. Literally.

If you are not familiar with the name AJ Mendez Brooks, formerly known as AJ Lee, she was one of the top female wrestlers for the WWE. She came, she conquered until the day she retired on her own terms.

AJ is my role model for many reasons. Growing up I’ve always admired the strong female wrestlers on TV. In a sport that’s mostly dominated by men, the women wrestlers were relegated to being valets, managers, or used for half time dance sessions in their underwear. But long gone are the days where women of wrestling are used as eye candy. They wrestle, they take bumps, they fight — literally. While there are many who could be attributed to helping lead the way of the women’s revolution amongst wrestlers, I personally feel that AJ helped mould our current group of female wrestlers. She was different — she wasn’t those tough chicks, she was skinny, small and packaged as a geek goddess (which she was). She appealed to young girls, older girls, males and females alike. There’s something special about her that forces people to look.

She was one of my favourite wrestlers (and still is!) and though I’m so sad that I can no longer see her on TV, I’m so happy she released a memoir. I preordered this and finally, it came and I devoured it in days. I loved learning more about her background. She came from nothing, from actual poverty, had her fair share of shit and was later diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

This book is important. Its revelant, not just for wrestling fans, but for non wrestling fans as well. She tackles the book in a simple tongue in cheek manner, its not difficult to get into the book at all. She talks in great lengths about her struggle with a bipolar mother, and later, her struggle being bipolar herself. I believe the book will help a lot of people — people who feel they are margianalised for being different, people who were bullied, people who suffer through mental illnesses. My favourite part is that she’s trying to break the stigma against the word crazy, against mental illness. There’s nothing to be ashamed of. Things happen, and you are not alone.

Read, open your mind and heart. You are never alone. This one will be on my favourite shelf for a long time (and by that I mean forever).