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Dirty Pretty Things by Michael Faudet

Dirty Pretty Things by Michael Faudet

Published 11 Aug 2016 By Andrews McMeel Publishing

Goodreads

Summary: Dirty Pretty Things is the much anticipated book by Michael Faudet.

His whimsical and often erotic writing has already captured the hearts and minds of literally thousands of readers from around the world. He paints vivid pictures with intricate words and explores the compelling themes of love, loss, relationships and sex.

All beautifully captured in poetry, prose, quotes and little short stories.

In the same vein as Lang Leav, Michael Faudet writes good steamy poetry. As the title of the poetry suggests, all of the poems within this book are quite rated. They’re mostly (if not all) about sex, love and relationships.

Just like Lang’s poetry, none of the poetry in Dirty Pretty Things are difficult to comprehend. They’re short, simple and pretty straight forward enough. His poems are quite visual, in the sense that you could imagine it right away. For those who are afraid to start reading poetry, both Michael Faudet and Lang Leav writes very simple poetry.

Most of the pieces revolve around sex, both yearning and wanting and the act itself. I did find that the pieces tend to sound repetitive due to the sexual nature of all of them (there’s only so many ways you could describe sex) but it was overall pretty good. His writing is not as floaty or pretty as Lang’s but both authors are completely different and the topics they write about differ greatly as well.

It is so hard not to compare the two works and authors, but it seems so difficult because Lang and Michael are actually a couple. In some ways you could see that their work compliments each other — one talks about more feelings while the other writes more about the physical aspects of a relationship. I feel like you’d have to read both Lang and Michael’s poetry books to get the whole picture (though both are good individually too) because both reflects greatly about what a relationship is like.

There were a few good pieces that I enjoyed from Dirty Pretty Things and I’m looking forward to pick up his next book of poetry.

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Sad Girls By Lang Leav

Sad Girls by Lang Leav
Published 30 May 2017 By Andrews McMeel Publishing

Goodreads

Summary: “Your first love isn’t the first person you give your heart to—it’s the first one who breaks it.”

Sad Girls is the much anticipated debut novel from international best-selling author Lang Leav. A beautifully written and emotionally charged coming of age story, where young love, dark secrets, and tragedy collide.

School is almost out for Audrey, but the panic attacks are just beginning. Because Audrey told a lie and now her classmate, Ana, is dead. Just as her world begins to spin out of control, Audrey meets the enigmatic Rad—the boy who could turn it all around. But will their ill-timed romance drive her closer to the edge?

 

Since the day that Lang Leav revealed that she was working on her debut novel, I was already clutching on to my pearls. I knew it was going to be frickin’ good.

I WAS NOT WRONG.

Before you go on thinking that this is a completely biased review, hold on to your horses because it isn’t. I don’t read what I don’t like but Sad Girls, yes, Sad Girls I loved.

There is something so poetic about the way Lang writes. Of course, if you didn’t know her already she’s a poet. I’m sure by now you’ve seen her artwork or poetry floating around twitter, tumblr and instagram but I have loved her work since she released Love & Misadventure. In fact, I’ve already met her thrice. (Read my review on her second poetry book, Lullabies!)

Sad Girls begins with our main protagonist, Audrey, admitting that she did something wrong. She told a lie and now Ana, one of her classmates is dead. The book follows through her struggle to cope with the lie she’s told, her newly found anxiety and then, she meets a boy.

Cliche, am I right? Just wait for it.

Audrey and Rad found each other in a moment of grief. They had an unspoken bound between them that they needed to stay with each other out of necessity. They are two very broken, very lost individuals who needed someone who help carry them forward. This relationship that happened between the two were the natural reactions of two sad souls, desperate for something to hold on to — and in this case, each other. Their romance was a natural progression: in fact, they cut ties from each other, both trying to find their own way through life alone and then later rekindled their love many months later.

Sad Girls talks about mental illness, drug abuse, death and a little bit of LGBTQ+. There are so many diverse characters in this book, each playing a very significant role in Audrey’s life. Almost all the characters in this book is flawed — especially Audrey and that’s what makes Sad Girls a little bit more realistic than the rest. Everyone, even the adults, are just people who are trying their best to get by. It’s not complicated; it’s just reality.

Of course there are times when I felt that Audrey had it too easy (like her job and internship) but it is what helped to drive the story along. I sat on this review for a while because I needed to process the whole book. I loved it, and its easily on of my favourite books of 2017 but there is one glaring problem with Audrey: I still don’t know why she told the lie.

I’d love to see Sad Girls made into a film (I could already picture the scenes in my head while reading this) or even a companion book told in Ana’s point of view. I feel like the epilogue left me longing for more. There’s so much about Ana that we don’t know (only told from the perspective of the other characters) and I feel like she could be an interesting character for us to learn more about.

Sad Girls will be on my mind for a long time to come. Pick it up, read it, and then reread it again.

A lot of literature is about struggle. But I don’t think all writers are sad. I think it’s the other way around — all sad people write. It’s a form of catharsis, a way of working through things that feel unresolved, like undoing a knot. People who are prone to sadness are more likely to pick up a pen.

Sad Girls by Lang Leav

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Lullabies By Lang Leav

Lullabies By Lang Leav
Publication Date: 16th Sept 2014 By Andrews McMeel Publishing

Goodreads

SummaryA sequel to the hugely popular, best-selling Love & MisadventureLullabies continues to explore the intricacies of love and loss.

Set to a musical theme, love’s poetic journey in this new, original collection begins with a Duet and travels through Interlude and Finale with an Encore popular piece from the best-selling Love & Misadventure. Lang Leav’s evocative poetry speaks to the soul of anyone who is on this journey.

Leav has an unnerving ability to see inside the hearts and minds of her readers. Her talent for translating complex emotions with astonishing simplicity has won her a cult following of devoted fans from all over the world.

Lang Leav is a poet and internationally exhibiting artist.

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Lang Leav’s Love & Misadventure is one of my favourite poetry books of all time. I also had the opportunity to meet her last year at a book signing she did here. Imagine my surprise when I found limited copies of Lullabies on the shelves at the bookstore! I ran, I paid, and I read. Immediately.

I read it in a day and fell in love.

I own many poetry books but I find myself constantly going back to Lang’s poetry. One of my favourite things about her writing is that it is simple and succinct enough that it doesn’t take much to understand the poem. I love that no matter how simple it is, it really tugs at your heartstrings and pulls you in.

I really enjoy poetry, but often I find that it can be very difficult to understand what the author is trying to say. You’d have to sit and think and really analyse what’s written and why it was written the way it was — and it gets critical sometimes. But I find that Lang Leav’s work is simplistic enough that even someone who isn’t too familiar with poetry can enjoy.

Lullabies is much longer than Love & Misadventure, but it does keep to the same feel of love, desire, yearning and loss. There are some longer pieces in Lullabies, all of which were very interesting to read. The compilation of poetry in Lullabies is just as the name suggests — it is soothing enough to bring you to another place even for a short while.

I highly recommend Lang Leav’s works, especially if you’re someone who is just starting out to read poetry. I think that Lang’s work is very relatable and it captures different emotions very well. I’ve re-read her first collection of poems so many times and I’m very certain I will do the same with Lullabies.

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Top Ten Tuesday | New-To-Me Authors

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Each week we list our top 10 book-related things. This week, we’re talking about:

Top 10 New-To-Me Authors I’ve Read In 2013

I’ve read some really good books from authors unfamiliar to me this year. Kim Young Ha is quickly becoming one of my favourite authors that I’ve discovered this year, while Kara Taylor is one of my favourite Young Adult debut author of the year. I am so happy to have finally read a John Green book (finally) and to discover the wonderful world of Bridget Jones.

Here are some of my favourites from this year:

1. Amy McNamara x Lovely, Dark and Deep
2. Helen Fielding x Bridget Jones’s Diary series
3. Abigail Haas (Abby McDonald) x Dangerous Girls
4. Kim Young Ha x I Have The Right To Destroy Myself
5. S.J. Watson x Before I Go To Sleep
6. Lisa & Laura Roecker x The Liar Society
7. Ernest Cline x Ready Player One
8. Kara Taylor x Prep School Confidential
9. Lang Leav x Love & Misadventure
10. John Green x The Fault In Our Stars